Atta CEO: Travel advisories – the elephant in the room?

In case you missed Nigel's recent article in Tourism Update:

‘The elephant in the room’ is an apt saying for the safari industry, well described as ‘ignoring an obvious problem by failing to address an issue that stands out in a major way’. The news from Kenya is horrifying – yet another terrorist attack designed to destabilise the status quo. The elephant is the travel advice that precedes and follows such incidents. An increased ‘non-essential’ travel warning for the Kenya coast last month raised howls of protest from our members, asking why are we ignoring an obvious problem by failing to address travel advisories, an issue that stands out in a major way?

The northern coast of Kenya is now in the ‘non-essential’ zone, which is a disaster for any remaining hopes of a tourist revival. Coastal tourism is in melt down and beach and safari packages are out of the window. If you are not in Kenya, you might reflect that their downfall is your gain. However, I would caution that approach as, in this climate, terrorism knows no boundaries and terrorist attacks carried out by small groups are unfortunately becoming a feature of global tourism, with serious incidents recently in Toronto, Sydney, Paris, Brussels, Copenhagen and Tunis. Today’s star destinations could fall just as quickly and become a rolling negative headline on Sky and CNN.

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‘The elephant in the room’ is an apt saying for the safari industry, well described as ‘ignoring an obvious problem by failing to address an issue that stands out in a major way’. The news from Kenya is horrifying – yet another terrorist attack designed to destabilise the status quo. The elephant is the travel advice that precedes and follows such incidents. An increased ‘non-essential’ travel warning for the Kenya coast last month raised howls of protest from our members, asking why are we ignoring an obvious problem by failing to address travel advisories, an issue that stands out in a major way?

The northern coast of Kenya is now in the ‘non-essential’ zone, which is a disaster for any remaining hopes of a tourist revival. Coastal tourism is in melt down and beach and safari packages are out of the window. If you are not in Kenya, you might reflect that their downfall is your gain. However, I would caution that approach as, in this climate, terrorism knows no boundaries and terrorist attacks carried out by small groups are unfortunately becoming a feature of global tourism, with serious incidents recently in Toronto, Sydney, Paris, Brussels, Copenhagen and Tunis. Today’s star destinations could fall just as quickly and become a rolling negative headline on Sky and CNN.

‘The elephant in the room’ is an apt saying for the safari industry, well described as ‘ignoring an obvious problem by failing to address an issue that stands out in a major way’. The news from Kenya is horrifying – yet another terrorist attack designed to destabilise the status quo. The elephant is the travel advice that precedes and follows such incidents. An increased ‘non-essential’ travel warning for the Kenya coast last month raised howls of protest from our members, asking why are we ignoring an obvious problem by failing to address travel advisories, an issue that stands out in a major way?

The northern coast of Kenya is now in the ‘non-essential’ zone, which is a disaster for any remaining hopes of a tourist revival. Coastal tourism is in melt down and beach and safari packages are out of the window. If you are not in Kenya, you might reflect that their downfall is your gain. However, I would caution that approach as, in this climate, terrorism knows no boundaries and terrorist attacks carried out by small groups are unfortunately becoming a feature of global tourism, with serious incidents recently in Toronto, Sydney, Paris, Brussels, Copenhagen and Tunis. Today’s star destinations could fall just as quickly and become a rolling negative headline on Sky and CNN. Continue reading here.